Saturday, September 24, 2011

More on Silent Christians

Yesterday, Dan Savage posted this video by John Shore on Slog.  The video makes it very simple. . .  Christians who insist on shoving their hatred down others' throats are guilty of the deaths of these young gay people who kill themselves.  Period.  If Christians believe that being made gay by their god (and that's the ONLY way anybody becomes gay) is evil, then they need to keep that sick, false belief to themselves.  And "good" Christians who know the truth about being gay are just as guilty as long as they don't yell their beliefs as loudly as the bigots yell their condemnation.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Silence Equals Assent: I've Had it with Christians



Troy Davis, RIP
My brother and sister–in–law live in a town in Northwest Georgia called Mount Airy.  It’s fairly remote, about 90 minutes from Atlanta, but it has had some development in the years before the Shrub took office.  It’s pretty country there, not far from mountains and lakes.  It’s also very religious, in a born–again, fundamentalist Christian sense.  There are many more churches in the area than there are stores or movie theaters.  The churches preach that old–time religion that so appeals to the teabaggers.  Alcohol was only recently allowed in the county, and still may not be sold on Sundays, although alcohol sales are allowed on the Jewish and Muslim Sabbaths.  The population of the county in the 2000 Census was almost 93% Caucasian.

My brother is progressive, even liberal.  He loves Keith Olbermann and the pundits on MS–NBC.  He enjoys arguing on line with his neighbors, discussing politics and baiting members of the ultra–conservative, Bible–believing, Tea Bag Party–loving populace of the county.

Habersham County, in which Mount Airy is situated, is demographically typical of much of the State of Georgia: a State of “Good ole boys” trying to live life as their ancestors lived it, believing in the same god, holding pretty much the same political views, and seeing life in a much different way than either my brother does, or I.

From this population tonight comes the execution of Troy Davis, a possibly innocent African–American man, convicted of killing a white policeman.  Christians throughout the State of Georgia, I am sure, are feeling satisfied that the justice called for in the law of Moses has been exacted from Mr. Davis.  “An eye for an eye,” their “good book” says.

The State of Georgia, and all its citizens who supported this execution, have sinned tonight, in my opinion, and should repent.  Whether or not Mr. Davis was guilty, his death does nothing to improve our culture, our ethos, or our political peace.  Rather, it drags all of us down to the level of those people who kill and rape and maim.  It makes barbarians of all of us in this country.

Jamey Rodemeyer, RIP
I don’t mean to belittle the State of Georgia.  The residents of the State who supported this murder tonight are no different from the residents of the State of New York who sat by and watched while Jamey Rodemeyer, a gay 14–year–old boy from Buffalo, was bullied to the point that he killed himself over the weekend.

I’m not angry at the States of Georgia and New York, or at any of the other parts of this country.  I am angry at the Christian Church.  How can these hypocrites sit back and allow capital punishment?  How can these homophobic assholes sit silent while beautiful and gifted gay youth are bullied, bashed, abused, disowned, and persecuted to the point of suicide?

I am beginning to hate Christians.  All Christians.  The vast majority, if not endorsing capital punishment and homophobia, watch while this country murders its citizens and allows homophobic bullies to roam free throughout the land.

Jesus was a man of peace.  Read the Gospels.  Until “good” “sensible” Christians understand their lord and savior and live their political lives according to that understanding, I am, from now on, including them with the rabid, dominionist fundamentalists.  They all bear the guilt.  Silence equals assent, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer taught us from Nazi Germany.  Unless and until Christians condemn, in word and solid action, these horrors committed by self–professed Christians, then all of them, in my view, are guilty.